Welcome 2020-2021 Interns!

 

Welcome to James Bender, Maria Stacy, and Monica Babaian!!  This will be a year in which we must take what COVID will allow–but we will, as our governor notes, get through this together. You are already brave, wise, and brilliant–so not far to go to become amazing clinicians!

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Friday Factoid: Altruism

Sarah Watts, MS

WKPIC Doctoral Intern

 

Why do we do good things for others? Altruism is the concept of unselfish concern for the welfare of others. It turns out that we might be willing to do good things for others because we want to be the best at it!!! Herman, Englemann, and Tommasello (2019) found that even children engage in altruistic behavior more frequently when children were competing with other children for being selected to be part of a group.

 

References

Herrmann, E., Engelmann, J. M., & Tomasello, M. (2019). Children engage in competitive altruism. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology179, 176–189. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2018.11.008

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Friday Factoid: Prosopagnosia

Sarah Watts, MS

WKPIC Doctoral Intern

 

Some people are not able to recognize people by looking at their faces. It is a condition called prosopagnosia, and individuals with this condition often rely on other cues, such as voices, to recognize loved ones. It can be caused by damage to the occipitotemporal lobe of the brain.

 

References

Harris, A. M., & Aguirre, G. K. (2007). Prosopagnosia. Current Biology : Cb17(1), 7–8.

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Friday Factoid: Change Blindness

Sarah Watts, MS

WKPIC Doctoral Intern

 

Did you know that people have a tendency to overlook or “ignore” changes to their environment, even big ones, when there is something that disrupts a person’s vision for just an instant? People can use this phenomenon to play tricks on you when you least expect it.

 

References

Dretske, F. (2004). Change blindness. Philosophical Studies120(1-3), 1–18.

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Friday Factoid: Groupthink

Sarah Watts, MS

WKPIC Doctoral Intern

 

Why do people seem to make poor decisions when they are with a group? Groupthink is something that can occur when members of a group go along with the group’s choice without thinking about the merits of the decision. Getting along with your group members may actually increase the probability that this will happen and the group will make a poor decision.

 

References

Russell, J. S., Hawthorne, J., & Buchak, L. (2015). Groupthink. Philosophical Studies : An International Journal for Philosophy in the Analytic Tradition172(5), 1287–1309. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11098-014-0350-8

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Friday Factoid: Infantile Amnesia

Sarah Watts, MS

WKPIC Doctoral Intern

 

Do you remember your 1st birthday… Me neither. There is a reason for this. Typically developing people will experience something called infantile or childhood amnesia, which is the inability of adults to recall memories from early childhood.

 

References

Memory from a to z : keywords, concepts, and beyond. Oxford University Press

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Friday Factoid: Superstition and Behaviorism

Sarah Watts, MS

WKPIC Doctoral Intern

 

Why do we have to wear the same socks to every baseball game? What makes us have superstitions, or unjustified beliefs in supernatural causes, for the outcome of different events. According to behavioral theorist, B. F. Skinner (1948), superstitions come from our behaviors being accidentally reinforced or rewarded. You wore your lucky socks and your baseball team won!

 

References

Skinner, B. F. (1948). ‘Superstition’ in the pigeon. Journal of Experimental Psychology38(2), 168–172. https://doi.org/10.1037/h0055873

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Friday Factoids: The Homunculus

Sarah Watts, MS

WKPIC Doctoral Intern

 

You have a tiny human in your brain. In a typically developing brain, individuals have sections of the brain that map onto the different parts of the body. Your brain has neurological maps that interpret the sensation of touch and control muscle movements in different parts of your body. If you want to wave hello, there is a part of your brain that specially designated to control you hand movement. If your nose itches, there is a part of your brain that is set aside for that too.

 

References

Kolb, B., & Whishaw, I. Q. (2011). An introduction to brain and behavior (3rd ed.). Worth.

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Friday Factoid: Conquering Quarantine Fatigue

Rebecca Girlinghouse, MA

WKPIC Doctoral Intern

 

Back in May, I began noticing the term “quarantine fatigue” being thrown around on the internet.  As shelter-in-place orders were reaching 30 days in many places, people were beginning to feel drained, irritable, stressed, and restless and they were not sure how to manage it (Cleveland Clinic, 2020).  While some have continued to shelter-in-place, others are facing the prospect of resumed quarantine as coronavirus numbers climb.  Although the prospect of continuing to shelter-in-place may arouse feelings of distress or anger, there are several ways you can manage quarantine fatigue:

 

  1. News Breaks: Make sure to be mindful of how much time you spend watching the news. Although it is good to stay informed, being constantly berated by the conflict and tragedy surrounding the coronavirus can be exhausting and overwhelming.  Especially, when you do not take a break from watching it and thinking about it (Cleveland Clinic, 2020).

 

  1. Be Kind to Yourself: It is alright to feel overwhelmed, irritable, sad, confused, or any other emotion during this time. People react to stressful situations in many different ways, because each person is unique.  Make sure you give yourself the time and space to feel whatever comes up for you and know there is no “right way” to feel about this situation (Cleveland Clinic, 2020).

 

  1. Don’t Drown in the Negative: People have a tendency to develop tunnel vision for negative events.  It’s natural.  However, reminding yourself of the positives can help make you feel more balanced (Cleveland Clinic, 2020). One way to do this is to write a list of things you are grateful for either when you first wake up or right before you go to bed.

 

  1. Routine: Although this one can be tough right now, developing even small daily routines can help decrease anxiety and stress, as well as help you feel a little more grounded and in control (Gray, 2020).

 

  1. Move: When staying at home all day, it is easy to sit on the couch and get lost in work or all those good streaming shows. However, sitting all day can increase fatigue and feelings of hopelessness, and also make it more difficult to fall asleep at night.  Therefore, even if you can just get out and walk around the block (while still social distancing), you will likely benefit and feel a little more energy (Gray, 2020).

 

  1. Socialize: I have heard many times that chatting with friends over video is not the same as face-to-face interactions.  I would have to agree.  However, for now, it is better than completely isolating, since this can increase loneliness, depression, and irritability.  Continuing to find ways to connect, even if they are not optimal, is so very important, especially right now (Gray, 2020).

 

References

Cleveland Clinic. (2020, May 14). Are you experiencing quarantine fatigue?. Healthessentials. https://health.clevelandclinic.org/are-you-experiencing-coronavirus-quarantine-fatigue/

 

Gray, D. (2020, May 4). Yes, “quarantine fatigue” is real.  Here’s how to cope. Healthline. https://www.healthline.com/health-news/quarantine-fatigue-is-real-heres-how-to-cope

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Friday Factoid: Racial Differences and Psychotropic Prescriptions

Sarah Watts, MS

WKPIC Doctoral Intern

 

Are there racial differences in the way psychotropic medication is prescribed to youth who are suffering from mental health problems? In today’s society it is important to explore the social and biological basis for treatment differences among individuals suffering from mental health symptoms. One such study by Cook et al. (2017) found that White children were more likely to be prescribed psychotropic medication when compared to Black and Latino children whether or not the children were exhibiting impairment in functioning. The reason for this is not currently understood and more research is needed to fully understand this difference. However, the findings highlight the importance of accurately targeting psychotropic medication across racial/ethnic groups.

 

References

Cook, B. L., Carson, N. J., Kafali, E. N., Valentine, A., Rueda, J. D., Coe-Odess, S., & Busch, S. (2017). Examining psychotropic medication use among youth in the u.s. by race/ethnicity and psychological impairment. General Hospital Psychiatry45, 32–39. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2016.12.004

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